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1913 YEAR BOOK 



SPEND YOUR VACATION AT 

"Chautauqua" 

Chautauqua, Illinois 



PURE AIR PURE SPRING WATER COOL NIGHTS 

FINE SWIMMING POOL MAGNIFICENT SCENERY 

BATHING BOATING FISHING 

AMPLE HOTEL ACCOMMODATION 



EXPENSES NOMINAL 



Nine Weeks of High 
Class Entertainment 



A COOL SUMMER RESORT TWO HOURS 
RIDE FROM ST. LOUIS 



RATES OF ADMISSION 

From June 1st to Sept. 6th every person on the Piasa Chautauqua Grounds 

is required to have a ticket. 

All tickets admit to Auditorium unless otherwise stated. 



BOAT TICKETS 

(Good only during stay of boat.) 

Adults 10c. Children 5c. 



ONE DAY TICKET 



(June 1st to June 27th) 
Adults 10c. Children 5c. 

ONE DAY TICKET 

(June 28th to September 6th) 

Adults 25c. Children 15c. 

WEEK END 

(Friday Evening until 6 o'clock Monday evening.) 
Adults 50c. Children 25c. 



ONE WEEK 

(During Assembly period, June 28th to August 31st.) 

Adults $1.25. Children 65c. 

Weekly — before and after Assembly period, Adults 50c. Children 25c. 



ASSEMBLY PERIOD 

(June 28th to August 31st.) 

Adults $4.00. Children $2.00. 

Assembly tickets good also for entire season. 



CLERGYMEN 
One week 65c. Assembly period and Season $2.00. 



BIBLE CONFERENCE WEEK 

(July 27th to August 2nd.) 

Adults $1.00. Children 50c. 

EMPLOYEES 
Season Ticket (Not good at Auditorium) $1.00. 
Season Ticket (Including Auditorium) $2.00. 



Persons over 15 years classed as adults. 

Children under 8 years, if accompanied by older person on paid ticket, Free. 

Tickets, presented by any except rightful owner, will be taken up. 



Chautauqua, Illinois 



a 



New Piasa Chautauqua" 



Piasa Chautauqua is the only successful, high-class Summer Resort near 
St. Louis. For thirty years, without intermission, Piasa has held an annual 
assembly, which has been enjoyed by thousands, and it is with pride the 
directors refer the discriminating public to Chautauqua's past successes. 

Piasa Chautauqua covers an area of 310 acres, with 120 substantial resi- 
dences, many quite elaborate and more being erected each season. Located 
38 miles from St. Louis, nestling in a beautiful valley between magnificent, 
towering bluffs, with the mighty Mississippi at its front and an almost unex- 
plored forest at its back — one of Nature's most picturesque spots, dear to all 
who have enjoyed its beauties. 




THE BUSY BUSINESS MAN LEAVING ON THE MORNING 
SPECIAL FOR THE CITY. 



The nights at Chautauqua are delightfully cool; many persons who can- 
not stand the sweltering heat and sleepless nights in the city, turn to Chau- 
tauqua for rest, recreation and up-building. 

The charm of Chautauqua is its beautiful scenery; here one finds at 
every turn, beauty to satisfy the eye, heart and mind; Restful, Peaceful — 
away from the city's busy throngs — a veritable "Peaceful Valley," where 
business and other worries do not enter. 

Chautauqua's principal attractions are, pure air, pure spring water, cool 
nights, beautiful scenery, ample hotel and boarding house accommodations, 
and a program, unsurpassed, and the equal, of any Chautauqua. 

The grounds are well policed and no objectionable characters, or intoxi- 



New Piasa Chautauqua 



cants are permitted. Children live and play outdoors all day long and become 
healthy and strong and may safely be left unattended as no possible harm can 
come to them. 

Season after season, many wise fathers send their families to Chautau- 
qua for an outing. While many who cannot stay an extended period spend 
the "week ends" with their families- 
One cannot help but be benefitted, mentally, morally and physically by 
a stay at Chautauqua, and will return much refreshed and strengthened for 
the daily round of home and business duties. 

To enjoy complete rest, you should spend a season at Chautauqua. How- 
ever short the time, you will find it well worth your while. 
Chautauqua is the garden spot of the Mississippi Valley. 



WHAT PIASA CHAUTAUQUA STANDS FOR 

Piasa Chautauqua in the Summer Assembly season stands primarily for 
the simplicity and naturalness of Christian living. It is built on the faith that 
unaffected, strightforward religion makes a life neither sanctimonious nor 
fanatical, but simple, normal, vital, free and glad. 

Piasa Chautauqua in its independent environment presents a concrete pic- 
ture of social Christianity, applied not in any Utopian scheme, but in the 
everyday relations of neighbors dwelling wholesomely together on principles 
of Christian good will. 

In an atmosphere as unconstrained as the atmosphere of a good home, 
Piasa Chautauqua rejoices in all the spontaneous joys of family and neigh- 
borhood life, enlarging the family sympathies to include the neighborhood 
and intensifying the neighborhood sense with much of common interest. Not 
as an addition to, but as an expression of the simple life it wishes to culti- 
vate. 

Piasa Chautauqua gives large place for recreation, amusements — down- 
right fun. From the initial of religion Piasa Chautauqua reaches out for 
everything that is hearty, hale, whole and unpretentious, and finds itself still 
within the pale of religion interpreted by its own large ideals. 

Whoever loves this comprehensive wholeness of life and despises the 
tacked-on conventionalities of artificial social standards — whoever prefers free- 
dom and frankness — will be welcome at Piasa Chautauqua, and having come, 
will be glad for Piasa Chautauqua. 



LIVING EXPENSES 

Expenses at Chautauqua are made as small as possible, thus placing an 
outing on the grounds within the reach of all. Besides the hotel there are 
many private boarding houses and cottages where guests can obtain rooms 
and board, or rooms and accommodations for light housekeeping. 

The store will be open throughout the season, and all kinds of groceries, 
fresh fruits and vegetables, meats, bread and cakes can be had at prices as 



Chautauqua, Illinois 



low as those of a city. The gardeners have an abundant supply of fresh 
vegetables throughout the entire season. Fresh butter, milk and eggs are 
supplied by the farmers of the neighborhood at very reasonable prices. Two 
refreshment pavillions are open — one at the main entrance, and the other 
near the auditorium — where lunches, ice cream, fruit and confectionery are 
sold. A number of furnished cottages can be rented for all or a part of the 
season at from $50 to .$150 for the entire season, and fine lots and platforms 
for tenting can also be rented. In every way Chautauqua is an ideal place 
and accommodations are obtainable at prices to suit all purses. Telephone 
and telegraph communication can be had with all parts of the country. Mails 
are received and sent out three times a day, except Sunday. Have your mail 
addressed to Chautauqua, III. 




PIASA SPRING 



THE FAMOUS PIASA SPRING 

The Hotel, Cottages and Swimming Pool are all supplied with the great 
health-giving Piasa Spring Water, an analysis of which shows it to be almost 
identical with the famous Eureka Springs water. 

The water is clear, cool, soft, pleasant and palatable. Purity is its great- 
est quality. There is not the slightest taint of mineral or other foreign 
substance in its taste. Pure water is nature's greatest solvent; it is the 
principle factor in healthy digestion, assimilation and excretion. Unadulterated 
with minerals or drugs of any kind, it is the greatest tonic of all waters. 
Pure natural spring water will kill germs which will live in distilled water. 



6 



New Piasa Chautauqua 



THE GROUNDS OF PIASA CHAUTAUQUA 

Leading from the Railroad Station at Chautauqua are two beautiful rustic 
bridges; the one to the left takes you to the "Inn," the other to the Assembly 
grounds of the Piasa Chautauqua. 

The Assembly grounds include over three hundred acres, all well shaded 
and with trim gravel driveways and walks leading to the hundreds of beau- 
tiful cottages, which are the summer homes of people from points far 
and near. The grounds are well lighted and supplied with running water 
from the great Piasa Spring. There are grocery and other stores on the 
grounds, also lunch counters, barber shop, cigar stands, hotels, boarding 
houses, etc. 

The program is made up of a most enjoyable series of entertainments, 
some new and attractive feature being provided each day. The Assembly is 
conducted on the same lines as the parent Chautauqua. The program includes 
lectures by the most prominent lecturers of the day; sermons by eminent 
divines, concerts, magic, moving pictures, etc. A large auditorium is located 
in the center of the grounds, where the entertainments are given. Near 
this Auditorum is the wonderful Piasa Spring. 




PIASA SPRINGS HOTEL. 



Piasa Springs Hotel, located near the center of the grounds, close to the 
famous Piasa Spring, has been thoroughly overhauled, renovated, refurnished 
and put in first-class condition throughout. For rates, see under heading 
"Hotels and Boarding Houses," on page 40. 



Chautauqua, Illinois 




THE INN, FROM THE STATION. 

"The Inn," a hotel containing 90 rooms, beautifully located, fronting the 
river, near the entrance and just outside the grounds, will be in charge of a 
competent manager with a first-class chef. An ideal place to spend the sum- 
mer vacation. Open June 1st. 

Bookings can be made by addressing THE INN, Chautauqua, 111., after 
June 1st; before that time address THE DUDLEY HOTEL, 4145 Lindell Boul., 
St. Louis, Missouri. 




NEW BRIDGE LEADING FROM 
STATION TO ASSEMBLY GROUNDS. 



New Piasa Chautauqua 



AMUSEMENTS AND RECREATIONS 

BOATING 

Several launches are at the service of Chautauqua visitors, together with 
an ample equipment of row boats. There will be regular launch trips daily, 
to Elsah and Grafton, also to any special neighborhood points that may be 
requested. Fishing tackle and bait at current prices. 




THE SWIMMING POOL. 



SWIMMING POOL 

Size 75 feet wide by 175 feet long. Enjoyed by men, women and children, 
daily, except Sunday. The depth is graduated from two feet to eight feet. 
There are springing boards, swing, and slide. Watching the bathers is one 
of the favorite pastimes of those who do not desire to take a plunge in the 
pool. 

What more attractive feature could be suggested than the great Chau- 
tauqua bathing pool? 

Depth at different points is plainly indicated by large figures, and the 
increase is so gradual that there is no danger for those who cannot swim, 
while the swimmer has room to enjoy as long a dash as is usually desired. 
An expert is in constant attendance to assist those who may wish to learn 
to swim. 

There are spring boards, tubs, ropes, etc., affording a variety of water 
amusements. 

Private dressing rooms and bathing suits can be had at reasonable 
prices. 

A refreshment stand is operated in connection with the pool where ices, 
light refreshments and cooling drinks can be had. No intoxicants are sold. 



Chautauqua, Illinois 



LAWN TENNIS 
The Lawn Tennis Courts are free to Cottagers and Visitors, 
racquets with you. 



Bring your 



CROQUET 

There are two public croquet grounds, in first-class condition, with 
the necessary equipment. The use of these grounds is free to Cottagers and 
Visitors. Croquet sets furnished free. 

BASEBALL 

The baseball grounds are in first-class condition. A competent director 
will make all engagements and assist in organizing teams and arranging 
games. A game is scheduled for every Saturday afternoon. 

CHAUTAUQUA SCENERY 

Take your camera and climb the bluffs. For miles about you on either 
side, you behold most magnificent scenery. Below, flows the mighty 
Mississippi, and the Illinois River in the distance. But little more than a 
mile away is the quaint, century-old village Elsah, to be reached by easy 
walk over the Bluffs or along the river's bank; off in the opposite direction 




THE ARRIVAL— TRAIN ROUNDING THE BLUFF. 



(distant about two miles), lies the town of Grafton, noted for fishing and 
boat building. There are many delightful walks through the woods to the 
rear of Chautauqua, also in either direction over the Bluffs. 

Piasa Chautauqua is less than two hours' ride from St. Louis, with fre- 
quent trains and boats at low rates. It is accessible from all points and 



10 



New Piasa Chautauqua 



within the means of all who take a summer vacation. The business man 
can live at Chautauqua and be at his business during the day without loss 
of time -or increase in living expenses. Furnished cottages can be rented at 
reasonable prices for the season or by the week or month. The hotel 
accommodations are first-class and at very reasonable rates. 

Excursions rates are offered during the entire assembly period, by both 
railroads and steamboats. The man who can only take a day or two from 
business or possibly be away over Sunday only, does not wish to devote much 
time. and money to getting to and from his resting place, and he with the 
longer vacation may not care to spend all his entertainment fund in transpor- 
tation. He can avoid this by coming to Piasa Chautauqua. 




ENTRANCE TO BEAUTIFUL CHAUTAUQUA GROUNDS. 



THE CHILDREN AT CHAUTAUQUA. 

The children always enjoy Chautauqua. Not only is it a place of pleasure 
for them, but it is one where they can profit both mentally and physically. 
The clubs and various sports will keep them interested, and the panorama of 
the river, with its passing boats, is always an attraction; the great swimming 
pool is of such depths that they can enter it without the least danger; swings, 
games, etc., will keep them busy, and the play ground always interests them. 



Chautauqua, Illinois 



11 




THE CHILDREN AT CHAUTAUQUA. 

IF YOU WISH YOUR CHILDREN TO DEVELOP MENTALLY 

AND PHYSICALLY CHAUTAUQUA IS THE VERY 

PLACE FOR THEM. 




VESPER SERVICE ON THE LAWN IN FRONT OF THE 

AUDITORIUM. 

HELD EVERY SUNDAY AFTERNOON 4:30 TO 5:15 P. M. 

GOOD SINGING— GOOD SPEAKING. 



12 New Piasa Chautauqua 

OFFICIAL PROGRAM— ASSEMBLY PERIOD 
SATURDAY, JUNE 28th 
8:00 P. M. Piano Selection, Miss Cornelia Brownlee, Official Pianist. 

— Address — ■ 
"PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE OF CHAUTAUQUA," 

C. Bernet, President. 
Humorous Recitation, Mrs. Pierre Grigg. 
Piano Selection, Miss Cornelia Brownlee. 
Soprano Solo, Miss Mildred Haynes. 

— Address — ■ 
"WHAT THE LADIES THINK OF CHAUTAUQUA," 

Mrs. C. V. R. Mechin, President Ladies' Civic Improvement As- 
sociation. 

— Announcements — 
M. Edwin Johnson 
"Star Spangled Banner," Sung by the Audience. 
"America," Sung by the Audience. 

SUNDAY, JUNE 29th 

9:30 A. M. Sunday School. (Classes for all ages.) 
11:00 A. M. Morning Service. Sermon by Rev. T. De Witt Peake, Pastor 
First M. E. Church, Lebanon, 111. 
4:30 P. M. Vesper Service. 
8:00 P. M. . Sacred Concert. 

MONDAY, JUNE 30th 

8:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 

8:00 P. M. CONCERT AND RECITAL. Mrs. Pierre Grigg, assisted by Miss 
Mary Wade, Vocalist, and Miss Pauline Kramer, Pianist. 

TUESDAY, JULY 1st 

8:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 
10:00 A. M. Classes in Expressional Art, led by Mrs. Pierre Grigg. 
10:30 A. M. Organization Chautauqua Chorus. Mr. Merritt A. Stipp, Chorus 
Leader. 

Mr. Stipp is a member of the well known "Clarion Trio" of 
Indianapolis. The association considers itself fortunate in hav- 
ing secured the services of so capable a leader. 
8:00 P. M. Motion Pictures. 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 2nd 

8:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 
10:00 A. M. Classes in Expressional Art, led by Mrs. Pierre Grigg. 
10:30 A. M. Practice Hour, Chautauqua Chorus. Mr. Merritt A. Stipp, Leader. 
8:00 P. M. Piano Selection, Miss Cornelia Brownlee. 
8:15 P. M. GEO. E. COLBY, Cartoonist. 

Mr. Colby draws with astonishing rapidity and ease, ac- 
companying his work on the easel with an almost continuous 
flow of entertaining, humorous, and instructive comment. He 
keeps his audience divided between wonder and applause. Mr. 
Colby gives an unique and interesting entertainment. He 
comes to us highly recommended. Colby night is always looked 
forward to with pleasure, as he never fails to please his 
audience. 



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Chautauqua, Illinois 13 

THURSDAY, JULY 3rd 

8:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 
10:00 A. M. Practice Hour, Chautauqua Chorus. 
8:00 P. M. Motion Pictures. 

FRIDAY, JULY 4th 

(Grand Independence Day Celebration) 
No fireworks of any kind will be permitted on the grounds. 
If you wish to avoid the noise and dangers incident to the cities on the 
Fourth of July, come to Chautauqua. Make your arrangements to stay aver 
until Sunday night or Monday morning. 
8:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 

Boat Race, Grafton to Chautauqua. Two prizes offered. 

Flag Raising. Singing of Patriotic Songs, led by Chautauqua 

Chorus. 
Water Sports, in pool, boys' and girls' swimming matches, fancy 

diving, etc. 
Y. M. C. A. Colored Male Quartette Jubilee Singers. 
Base Ball Game. 

Colored Jubilee Singers at the Station. 
8:00 P. M. Grand display of fireworks on the river front. 

SATURDAY, JULY 5th 

Devotional Hour. 

Practice Hour, Chautauqua Chorus. 

Classed in Expressional Art, led by Mrs. Pierre Grigg. 

"YE OLDE TIME CONCERT," under auspices of Ladies' Civic 

Improvement Association. 

Any entertainment given by the L. C. I. A. may be depended 

upon to be original, novel and worth going miles to hear. 

Our audience can rest assured this evening's concert will be 

fully up to expectations. 

SUNDAY, JULY 6th 

Sunday School. Classes for all ages. 

Morning service. Sermon by Rev. Albert Merritt Ewert, Pastor 

First M. E. Church, Pawnee, 111. 
Vesper Service. 
Sacred Concert, led by Chautauqua Chorus. 

MONDAY, JULY 7th 

Devotional Hour. 

Practice Hour, Chautauqua Chorus. 

Classes in Expressional Art, led by Mrs. Pierre Grigg. 

"SONG AND STORY," by the Misses Isenberg, Smith and Eddy, 

in an evening of Song, Story and Music. 

Their program is varied and decidedly interesting. There 

will not be a dull moment the entire evening. 

TUESDAY, JULY 8th 

8:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. » 

10:00 A. M. Practice Hour, Chautauqua Chorus. 

11:00 A. M. Classes in Expressional Art, led by Mrs. Pierre Grigg. 

§; 00 P. M. Motion Pictures. 



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14 New Piasa Chautauqua 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 9th 
Devotional Hour. 

Practice Hour, Chautauqua Chorus. 

Classes in Expressional Art, led by Mrs. Pierre Grigg. 
Concert by "CECELIA QUARTETTE." Mrs. Howard Watson, 
Leader. 

The ladies composing the Cecelia Quartette need no intro- 
duction to a Piasa Chautauqua audience. They have appeared 
before us on several occasions in the past. There have been 
many requests for their engagement this year. The Cecelias 
render a strictly high class entertainment. Their hosts of 
friends will be delighted to know that they are to be with us 
again. Every member of this Quartette is a finished soloist. 
THURSDAY, JULY 10th 
Devotional Hour. 

Practice Hour, Chautauqua Chorus. 

Classes in Expressional Art, led by Mrs. Pierre Grigg. 
Cecelia Quartette. 
Motion Pictures. 

FRIDAY, JULY 11th 
Devotional Hour. 

Practice Hour, Chautauqua Chorus. 

Classes in Expressional Art, led by Mrs. Pierre Grigg. 
"Cecelia Quartette." • 

CONCERT BY JERSEYVILLE TALENT, under direction of Miss 
Cornelia Brownlee. 

This entertainment promises to be one of the best of the 
season, as Jerseyville will send her very best talent. Any 
entertainment which Miss Brownlee has in charge is sure to 
be excellent. 

SATURDAY, JULY 12th 
8:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 
10:00 A. M. Practice Hour, Chautauqua Chorus. 

11:00 A. M. Classes in Expressional Art, led by Mrs. Pierre Grigg. 
7:45 P. M. "Cecelia Quartette." 
8:00 P. M. "MOCK TRIAL," under direction of L. C. I. A. 

If you have never attended a mock trial, you should be on 
hand for this one. Better button up tight for fear you may 
split your sides laughing. Talk about "fun," here's where you 
get it in plenty. If you miss this, you will be sorry. 

SUNDAY, JULY 13th 
Sunday School. Classes for all ages. 
Morning Service. Sermon by Rev. Edwin J. Kulp, D. D., of 

Maple Avenue Methodist Church, St. Louis. 
Vesper Service. 
"Cecelia Quartette." 
Sacred Concert, led by Chautauqua Chorus. 

MONDAY, JULY 14th 

Devotional Hour. 

Practice Hour, Chautauqua Chorus. 

"Cecelia Quartette." 

CONCERT AND RECITAL, by the Misses Blanche Caughlan and 
Olga Hambuechen and Mrs. Dr. Little. 

These ladies need no introduction to our audience, having 
appeared before us in the past with great success, since which 
time they have perfected and increased their repertoire. Press 
notices refer to their entertainments in a highly commendatory 
manner. We look forward to their appearance with much 
pleasure. 



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Chautauqua, Illinois 15 

TUESDAY, JULY 15th 



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Devotional Hour. 

Practice Hour, Chautauqua Chorus. 

"Cecelia Quartette." 

Motion Pictures. 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 16th 

8:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 
10:00 A. M. Practice Hour, Chautauqua Chorus. 

8:00 P. M. CHARLES R. TAGGERT, Entertainer. 

In descriptive piano selections and songs, recitations and 
character sketches, ventriloquial dialogues, violin mimicry — 
An artistic, humorous and wholesome entertainment. His en- 
entertainments are a pronounced success from every stand- 
point. Mr. Taggart's aim is neither to teach nor preach, to 
advise nor lecture, but to turn pain into pleasure by music, 
worries into wonderment by mimicry, sadness to smiles by 
humor. Taggart is a drawing card at all Chautauquas. 

THURSDAY, JULY 17th 

8:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 
10:00 A. M. Practice Hour, Chautauqua Chorus. 
8:00 P. M. Motion Pictures. 

FRIDAY, JULY 18th 

30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 
10:00 A. M. Practice Hour, Chautauqua Chorus. 

00 P. M. An evening of Instrumental Music, by Edwardsville Band. 

SATURDAY, JULY 19th 

Devotional Hour. 

Practice Hour, Chautauqua Chorus. 

Water Sports on River. 

Base Ball Game. 

MISS EVELYN BARGELT, Color Cartoonist. 

Miss Bargelt's drawings are as beautiful as paintings. With 
her crayons of different colors, Miss Bargelt produces before 
her audiences many landscapes which appear as beautiful as 
paintings, while her humorous drawings are as funny as the 
comic section of the Sunday papers. While her pictures are 
taking shape under her deft fingers, she charms her hearers 
with flashes of wit and humor. She has the power to charm 
her audience as but few can. She never fails to win the 
approval and applause of her audience. 

SUNDAY, JULY 20th 

9:30 A. M. Sunday School. Classes for all ages. 
11:00 A. M. Morning Service. Sermon by Rev. John Henderson Moorehead, 
Pastor, First United Presbyterian Church, St. Louis, Mo. 
4:30 P. M. Vesper Service. 
8:00 P. M. Sacred Concert, Chautauqua Chorus. 



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16 New Piasa Chautauqu a 

MONDAY, JULY 21st 

WOMAN'S WEEK 

Conducted by Mrs. E. F. Ford, Greenfield, 111. 

A Week's Program of Great- Interest to Women 

8:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 

10:00 A. M. School of Household Science. "Classification and Elements of 

Food." The Balanced Ration. 
8:00 P. M. An evening of "DRAMA AND MUSIC," Mrs. Dr. Edgar Little 
and Miss Hunt. 

These ladies, well known to most Piasa Chautauquans will 
be listened to with great pleasure. Their entertainments are 
refined and educational. We consider it a distinct advantage 
to be able to have them with us. We may safely assure our 
audience a very delightful evening. 

TUESDAY, JULY 22nd 

8:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 
10:00 A. M. School of Household Science. "Vegetables and Fruits in the 

Diet." Demonstration. 
10:00 A. M. Practice Hour, Chautauqua Chorus. 

8:00 P. M. Motion Pictures. 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 23rd 

8:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 

10:00 A. M. School of Household Science. "Meats and Their Substitutes." 
Demonstration. 

10:30 A. M. Practice Hour, Chautauqua Chorus. 
8:00 P. M. NOAH BEILHARZ. 

Mr. Beilharz was secured after much difficulty because of 
his many advance engagements. We felt to leave him out of 
our program this season would be doing our people an injustice. 
Mr. Beilharz has had 15 years' platform experience and has 
given more than 3,000 entertainments, which will give the 
reader some idea of his popularity. He presents whole plays 
in monologue form and has made a specialty, the past season, 
of David Warfield's great play, "The Music Master," to the 
portrayal of whose intense situations he is temperamentally 
adapted. His other programs are "The Hoosier School Master," 
"The End of the World," "A Pair of Spectacles," and a mis- 
cellaneous program, using wigs and make-up. To miss seeing 
"Beilharz, the Great," is a downright loss. 

THURSDAY, JULY 24th 

8:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 
10:00 A. M. School of Household Science. "Bread, Biscuits and Muffins." 

Demonstration. 
10:30 A. M. Practice Hour, Chautauqua Chorus. 

8:00 P. M. Motion Pictures. 



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8:20 P. 


M. 



Chautauqua, Illinois 17 

FRIDAY, JULY 25th 

Devotional Hour. 

School of Household Science. "Salads and Salad Dressings." 

Demonstration. 
Practice Hour, Chautauqua Chorus. 
Piano Selection, Miss Cornelia Brownlee. 
Address — "Man's Greatest Need," Mrs. E. F. Ford. 
"OLD TIME SONGS." A real old time song fest, sung by the 

audience, led by Chautauqua Chorus. 

"America" 

"Lead Kindly Light" 

"Long, Long Ago" 

"Loves Old Sweet Song" 

"Old Black Joe" 

"The Old Oaken Bucket" 

"Speed Away" 

"We're Tenting Tonight" 

"Auld Lang Syne" 

"Good Night Ladies" 



SATURDAY, JULY 26th 

Mothers' Day 

Closing Day of Womans' Week 

8:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 
10:00 A. M. School of Household Science. "Bread Judging Contest." 

The bread score-card explained and demonstrated, Mrs. Ford. 
2:00 P. M. Twentieth Century Baby Show. Babies' health contest. For the 
scientific development of the perfect child. 

Babies from six months to three years, eligible. Entries 
limited to 15 babies. Dr. H. H. Helbing of St. Louis will score 
the babies according to scientific principles, and each parent 
will be given a card stating the percentage on points of their 
babies. Looks do not enter into this contest. It's health only, 
which counts. Mrs. Torrence and a corps of nurses will assist 
Dr. Helbing. Three prizes will be given. 
2:30 P. M. Needlework Contest. Exhibition of embroidery and crocheting. 
Class A — Best piece of work, under 12 years. 
Class B — Best piece of work, 12 to 18 years. 
Class C — Best piece of work, over 18 and under 80 years. 
Prizes given in each class. 
3:00 P. M. Darning Contest. Open to girls under 16 years. 

Best darn in table linen, not less than one inch. 
Best darn in stocking, not less than one inch. 
Base Ball Game. 

Short Talks on "Eugenics" and "Hygiene." 
Babies will be on exhibition. 
Sketch, "LITTLE WOMEN," by Dramatic Club. 

Readings by Mrs. Chas. Horner, Exponent of Child Verse, 
and President "Wednesday Club," East St. Louis. Auspices 
of Ladies' Civic Improvement Association. 

"P. S. — Buy a flower in memory of your mother." 



3:30 P. 


M. 


4:00 P. 


M. 


4:30 P. 


M. 


8:00 P. 


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11:00 A. 


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18 New Piasa Chautauqua 

BIBLE CONFERENCE WEEK 

JULY 27th TO AUGUST 2nd 
SUNDAY 

9:30 A. M. Sunday School. Dr. Franklin McElfresh, Superintendent. 

Lesson: "Moses' Request Refused," Ex. 4:29 6:1. 
Morning Worship. Preaching by Rev. W. J. Williamson, D. D. 

Theme: "The Heart of the Great Apostle." 

Vocal solo, Miss Mildred Haynes. 

Congregational singing led by Mr. Erskine Reed. 
Vesper Service. Address by Dr. Williamson. 
Sacred Concert directed by Mr. Erskine Reed. 

MONDAY 

9:00 A. M. Chorus led by Mr. Erskine Reed. 

Mr. Reed is one of the most experienced chorus directors 
in the middle west. He has had charge of the music in many 
important conventions. We consider ourselves fortunate in 
securing his service for Bible Conference Week, and we hope 
a large number of Piasa people will avail themselves of this 
unusual opportunity for chorus practice. 

9:00 A. M. Children's Hour, conducted by Miss Nona Lee Dover. 

Among all the speakers during Bible Conference Week, none 
will be more appreciated than Miss Dover. It is the desire 
of the management that this week shall be one of inestimable 
blessing to the children, and no one is better qualified for the 
work than Miss Dover. It is to be hoped that the children 
will all be present at the Monday meeting. We are confident 
there will be no difficulty with the attendance during the re- 
mainder of the week. Miss Dover has charge of a department 
of work of one of the National Sunday School Boards, and 
at the present time is engaged in preparing some of its graded 
lesson manuals, 

9:45 A. M. Religious Education Hour, Dr. Franklin McElfresh. Subject, 
"Non-religious Education the Work of the State." 

The coming of Dr. McElfresh, who is superintendent of 
Teacher Training of the International Sunday School Associa- 
tion, presents an opportunity not often afforded Piasa Chau- 
tauquans. Dr. McElfresh is a man of rare culture, broad travel, 
and thorough acquaintance with the problems of the religious 
world. His addresses will be remarkably helpful to Sunday 
School teachers and officers, as well as to parents, and of 
unusual interest to all who are concerned with the present 
day movements in the kingdom of God. 

10:30 A. M. Address. Subject, "A Young Man's Religion," I by Prof. How- 
ard G. Colwell. 

Mr. Colwell needs no introduction to our people. Through- 
out the middle West he is known as one of the most success- 
ful teachers and leaders of young men. He has delivered 
many addresses on the problems of young men, and has de- 
voted earnest study and systematic effort to their practical 
solution. His subject is most timely, and his addresses will 
be exceedingly profitable to those who are so fortunate as to 
hear him. The problem of saving and developing the young 
man is the most serious work before the modern church, and 
Mr. Colwell's discussion of this problem ought to interest 
everybody. 



9:00 A. 


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9:00 A. 


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9:45 A. 


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10:30 A. 


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11:15 A. 


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6:45 P. 


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8:00 P. 


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Chautauqua, Illinois 19 

11:15 A. M. Bible Hour. Expository Study of the Book of Ephesians by 
Dr. Williamson. 

6:45 P. M. Sunset Meeting at the Railroad Station. Song Service led by 

Mr. Erskine Reed and brief address by Dr. Williamson. 
8:00 P. M. Evening of Song and Story. 



TUESDAY. 

Song Service, led by Mr. Erskine Reed. 

Children's Hour conducted by Miss Dover. 

Religious Education Hour. Subject, "Religious Education the 

Work of the Churches," Dr. McElfresh. 
"A Young Man's Religion," II by Prof. Colwell. 
Expository Study in Ephesians by Dr. Williamson. 
Sunset Meeting at the Station. 
Song Service, led by Chautauqua Chorus. 
Address by Dr. Williamson. Subject, "A Religion of Sunshine." 



WEDNESDAY 

Song Service led by Mr. Erskine Reed. 

Children's Hour, led by Miss Dover. 

Religious Education Hour. "The Sunday School and the Bible," 

Dr. McElfresh. 
Address by Prof. Frederic Oakes Sylvester. 

Prof. Sylvester needs no introduction to Piasa people. He 
has international fame as the poet and painter of the Missis- 
sippi. His paintings have taken high rank among those who 
love the beautiful in nature, and his volume of verses entitled, 
"The Great River," has immortalized the history and senti- 
ment of our noble Father of Waters. 
11:15 A. M. Bible Hour. Expository Study in Ephesians by Dr. Williamson. 
6:45 P. M. Sunset Meeting at the Station. 
8:00 P. M. Song Service, led by Chautauqua Chorus. 
Address by Dr. McElfresh. 



THURSDAY 

Song Service led by Mr. Erskine Reed. 

Children's Hour, led by Miss Dover. 

Religious Education Hour. "The Sunday School as a Training 
for Social Service," by Dr. McElfresh. 

Address by Prof. Frederic Oakes Sylvester. 

Bible Hour. Expository Study in Ephesians by Dr. Williamson. 
6:45 P. M. Sunset Service at the Station. 
8:00 P. M. Motion pictures. 



9 


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9 


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9 


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.0 


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9:00 A. 


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20 New Piasa Chautauqua 



FRIDAY 

Song Service led by Mr. Erskine Reed. 

Children's Hour, led by Miss Dover. 

Religious Education Hour. "The Sunday School a Field for the 
Christian Worker," by Dr. McElfresh.. 

Address: "The Child and the Sunday School Teacher," by Miss 
Nona Lee Dover. 

Bible Study Hour. Expository Study in Ephesians by Dr. Wil- 
liamson. 

Sunset Service at the Station. 

Motion Pictures. 



SATURDAY 

Song Service led by Mr. Erskine Reed. 

Children's Hour, led by Miss Dover. 

Religious Education Hour. ,"The Sunday School and the Nation," 
by Dr. McElfresh. 

Address: "The Child and the Home," by Miss Nona Lee Dover. 

Bible Study Hour. Expository Study in Ephesians by Dr. Wil- 
liamson. 

Sunset Meeting at the Station. 

An evening of song and story. 

SUNDAY, AUGUST 3rd 

Sunday School. Classes for all ages. 

Morning Service. Sermon by Rev. Fay Merriott, Pastor, 

1st M. E. Church, Brighton, 111. 
Vesper Service. 
Sacred Concert. 

MONDAY, AUGUST 4th 

8:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 
10:00 A. M. Practice Hour, Chautauqua Chorus. 
8:00 P. M. RECITAL, by Morse School of Expression, St. Louis. 

The character of work furnished by the faculty and students 
of the Morse School of Expression is too well known to re- 
quire comment. Suffice to say, it is all strictly first-class in 
every respect and a credit to the institution its people repre- 
sent. Something good and genuinely entertaining may confi- 
dently be looked forward to. The Morse School has never been 
known to disappoint an audience. 

TUESDAY, AUGUST 5th 

8:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 
10:00 A. M. Practice Hour, Chautauqua Chorus. 
8:00 P. M. Motion Pictures. 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6th 

8:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 
10:00 A. M. Chorus. 
8:00 P. M. Dramatic Readings, by Mrs. Chas. M. Horner, 



9:00 


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9:00 


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9:45 


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10:30 


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Mrs. Charles M. Horner is a dramatic reader of great ability. 
The wide difference in the character of her work shows her 
to be a most wonderful artist. She is a charming and versa- 
tile young woman, capable of holding any audience and sending 
them away satisfied. 



Chautauqua, Illinois 21 



10 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 7th 

30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 

00 A. M. Practice Hour, Chautauqua Chorus. 

00 P. M. Motion Pictures. 



8:30 A. 


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2:00 P. 


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FRIDAY, AUGUST 8th 

8:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 
10:00 A. M. Practice Hour, Chautauqua Chorus. 
8:00 P. M. "YE OLD FASHIONED SPELLIN' BEE," by Chautauquans. 

An old fashioned Spelling Bee always furnishes a bushel of 
fun. For downright, wholesome amusement, nothing excels 
this old time form of entertainment. 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 9th 
Devotional Hour. 

Practice Hour, Chautauqua Chorus. 
Water Sports on River. Prizes given. 
Base Ball Game. 
"LILIPUTIAN WEDDING," by Chautauqua Talent. 

Under auspices Ladies' Civic Improvement Association. 'Nuff 
sed. Never before seen at Chautauqua. 

SUNDAY, AUGUST 10th 

9:30 A. M. Sunday School. Classes for all ages. 
11:00 A. M. Morning Service. Sermon by Rev. J. Wesley Cummins, of First 

Methodist Church, East St. Louis, 111. 
4:30 P. M. "Vesper Service. 
8:00 P. M. Sacred Concert. 

MONDAY, AUGUST 11th 

Children's Week 
8:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 

9:30 A. M. Organization Children's Chorus, by Miss Flora B. Dawson. 
10:00 A. M. Practice Hour, Chautauqua Chorus. 
8:00 P. M. "PROFESSIONAL SPELLING MATCH," by experts from St. 
Louis, East St. Louis, Alton, Jerseyville, and others. A battle 
of the Giants. 

TUESDAY, AUGUST 12th 

8:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 

9:30 A. M. Children's Chorus.* "Tales from Land of Wooden Shoes," led 

by Miss Flora B. Dawson. 
10:00 A. M. Practice Hour, Chautauqua Chorus. 
8:00 P. M. MR. SIDNEY LANDON, Character Artist. 

Mr. Landon's impersonations are wonderful, his work artis- 
tistic. He presents characters as they exist, and appears in 
make-up for each character, changing rapidly before his audi- 
ence. 

Mr. Landon introduces a line of impersonations decidedly out 
of the ordinary — Mark Twain, Bill Nye, the German Politician; 
the Swede, the Dutchman — these and many others are por- 
trayed and faithfully impersonated in quick succession in full 
view of the audience by merely a few swift touches of a brush 
and the donning of a wig, mustache, etc. 

His selections are both pathetic and humorous. Mr. Landon 
is an artist of remarkable ability. A rare treat is promised. 



22 New Piasa Chautauqua 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13th 

8:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 

9:30 A. M. Children's Chorus, Stories "Straight from China," led by Miss 

Dawson. 
8:00 P. M. Motion Pictures. 

THURSDAY, AUGUST 14th 

Epworth League Conference 

(August 14th to 17th Inclusive) 

Under co-operation of the Central Office of Epworth League 

Morton M. Wolff, Chairman, No. 216 International Life Bldg., St. Louis; 

Olive 686. 
W. F. Schelp, Secretary, No. 604 Merchants-Laclede Bldg., St. Louis; Main 593. 

Registration fee for delegates, $1.00. 

Admission to Chautauqua grounds during the Conference, free to delegates. 

Delegates must secure badge from their President or from Conference 

Committee at Chautauqua. 

6:30 A. M. Sunrise Prayer Meeting, led by President Harmon. 
8:00 A. M. Class on Bible Study, led by President Harmon. 
9:00 A. M. Class on Church Study, led by Rev. B. F. Jones. 

Class on Mercy and Help, led by Miss Isabelle Horton. 
Class on Junior Work, led by Miss Louise Dalby. 
10:00 A. M. Class on Christian Stewardship, led by Rev. S. B. Campbell. 
Class on Missions, led by Rev. W. H. Teeter. 
Class on Social and Literary Work, led by Rev. B. F. Jones. 
11:00 A. M. Class on Senior Methods. Led by Dr. Jno. Thompson. 
1:00 P. M. to 6 P. M. Recreation. 
7:10 P. M. Group Prayer Meetings. 
7:30 P. M. Song and Testimony Meeting, led by W. F. Schelp. Singing in 

charge of Rev. R. A. Hunt. 
8:00 P. M. Sermon by Rev. F. L. Geyer. Singing led by Rev. R. A. Hunt. 



FRIDAY, AUGUST 15th 
Epworth League Conference 



6:30 A. M. Sunrise Prayer Meeting, led by Rev. B. F. Jones. 
8:00 A. M. Class on Bible Study, led by President Harmon. 
9:00 A. M. Class on Church History, led by Rev. B. F. Jones. 

Class on Mercy and Help, led by Miss Isabelle Horton. 
Class on Junior Work, led by Miss Louise Dalby. 
10:00 A. M. Class on Christian Stewardship, led by Rev. S. B. Campbell. 
Class on Social and Literary Work, led by Rev. B. F. Jones. 
Class on Missions, led by Rev. W. H. Teeter. 
11:00 A. M. Class on Senior Methods. Led by Dr. Jno. Thompson. 
6:40 P. M. Group Prayer Meetings. 

7:00 P. M. Epworth League Meeting, led by President of the St. Louis 
German Epworth League Union. Singing in charge of Rev. 
R. A. Hunt. 
8:00 P. M. Sermon by Rev. H. J. Diercks. Singing led by Rev. R. A. Hunt. 



6 


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00 A. 


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9 


00 A. 


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Chautauqua, Illinois 23 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 16th 

Epworth League Conference 

Sunrise Prayer Meeting, led by Rev. R. A. Hunt. 
Class on Bible Study, led by President Harmon. 
Class on Church History, led by Rev. B. F. Jones. 
Class on Mercy and Help, led by Miss Isabelle Horton. 
Class on Junior Work, led by Miss Louise Dalby. 
10:00 A. M. Class on Christian Stewardship, led by Rev. S. B. Campbell. 
Class on Social and Literary Work, led by Rev. B. F. Jones. 
Class on Missions, led by Rev. W. H. Teeter. 
11:00 A. M. Class on Senior Methods. Led by Dr. Jno. Thompson. 
7:10 P. M. Group Prayer Meetings. 
7:30 P. M. Song and Testimony Service, led by John R. Longmire. Singing 

in charge of Rev. R. A. Hunt. 
8:00 P. M. Sermon, by REV. W. H. TEETER. Singing led by Rev. R. A. 
Hunt. 



SUNDAY, AUGUST 17th 

6:30 A. M. Sunrise Prayer Meeting, led by Miss Isabelle Horton. 
9:30 A. M. Sunday School. 
11:00 A. M. Morning Service. Sermon by President John H. Harmon of 

McKendree College. 
3:00 P. M. Consecration Service, led by Dr. John Thompson. 
7:00 P. M. Epworth League Meeting, led by the President of the St. Louis 

Epworth League Union. 
8:00 P. M. Evangelistic Sermon, by Rev. S. B. Campbell. 

MONDAY, AUGUST 18th 

8:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 

9:30 A. M. Children's Drill & Folk Dance, "Japan Fairy Lore" (in costume), 

led by Miss Flora B. Dawson. 
8:00 P. M. ENTERTAINMENT, by Chautauqua Talent. Readings, Music, 

Solos, etc. An enjoyable evening is assured. 

TUESDAY, AUGUST' 19th 

30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 

30 A. M. Children's Drill and Folk Lore, led by Miss Flora B. Dawson. 

00 P. M. Motion Pictures. 



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20th 

!:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 

► : 30 A. M. Children's Drill and Folk Lore, led by Miss Flora B. Dawson. 

i:00 P. M. RECITAL BY MRS. BESSIE BOWN RICKER. 

Mrs. Ricker has an exceptionally pleasing personality and 
address which gives her work a charm that is peculiarly its 
own. Her repertoire includes selections from Riley, Field, etc., 
etc., and many anonymous and original monologues. Mrs. Ricker 
also gives clever impersonations in French and Negro dialect 
and a number of pleasing society sketches. Her work is ex- 
quisite in delicacy and poise. To hear her is a rare treat. 



24 New Piasa Chautauqua 

THURSDAY, AUGUST 21st 
(W. C. T. U. Day) 
8:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 

9:30 A. M. Children's Drill and Folk Dance, led by Miss Flora B. Dawson. 
2:15 P. M. A Chorus from the Young Ladies' Bible Class of the Congrega- 
tional Sunday School, Alton, 111. 
2:30 P. M. "Scientific Temperance Instruction in Our Public School," Prof. 
L. W. Ragland, Greenfield; Miss Adelia Miner Randall, Alton. 
7:30 P. M. Chorus Young Ladies' Bible Class, Congregational Sunday 
School, Alton. 

Soloists — Miss Emily Louise Joestring and Miss Lilian Marie 
Bauer. 

Reading. by Mrs. Homer Willard Davis, Alton, 111. 
S:00 P. M. Address, Mrs. Frances E. Beauchamp, State President of 
Womans' Christian Temperance Union, Lexington, Ky. 

FRIDAY, AUGUST 22nd 

(W. C. T. U. Day) 
8:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 
10:00 A. M. Annual meeting and election of officers of Chautauqua Woman's 
Christian Temperance Union at W. C. T. U. Cottage. 
2:15 P. M. Concert by Medora young people. 

2:30 P. M. Institute conducted by Mrs. Frances E. Beauchamp, Lexington, 
Kentucky. 
Health and Heredity, Mrs. E. F. Ford, Greenfield, 111. 
The Mischief Trip of Alcohol, Miss Grace Enos, Jerseyville, 111. 
7:30 P. M. Concert — Young people of Jerseyville, 111. 

8:00 P. M. Grand Gold Medal Contest. Contestants from Madison, Macoupin, 
Greene and Jersey Counties. 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 23rd 

8:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. * 

9:30 A. M. Children's Drill and Folk Dance, led by Miss Flora B. Dawson. 

2:30 P. M. Water Sports. Prizes given. 

3:30 P. M. Base Ball Game. 

8:00 P. M. "THE LITTLEST REBEL," an Interpretative Recital, inter- 
spersed with appropriate songs, by Misses Sadie and Ruth 
Starr. 

"The Littlest Rebel," by Edward Peple, is widely varied with 
humor and pathos. The story is placed in the South, during 
the darkest, bitterest period of the Civil War. Herbert Cary 
of the Confederate Army leaves his little daughter Virgie, 
alone, in a cabin, in the Negro quarters, their own home having 
been burned by the Yankees. He is being searched for by a 
Cavalry troop in command of Lieutenant-Colonel Morrison of 
the Union Army. 

A reward of $500.00 is offered to take him dead or alive, for 
having entered the Union lines. 

Those who saw Dustin Farnum in the play, will appreciate 
the rare treat in prospect in the reading by Miss Starr, a young 
lady of charming personality, and fully capable of doing her 
subject justice. 

• SUNDAY, AUGUST 24th 

9:30 A. M. Sunday School. Classes for all ages. 
11:00 A. M. Morning Service. Sermon by Rev. W. F. Aull, D. D., Pastor, 
First Presbyterian Church, East St. Louis, 111. 
4:30 P. M. Vesper Service. 
8:00 P. M. Sacred Concert, led by Chautauqua Chorus. 



Chautauqua, Illinois 25 

MONDAY, AUGUST 25th 
8:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 
9:30 A. M. Children's Drill and Marches. 
8:00 P. M. Piano Selection, Miss Cornelia Brownlee. 
"OLD TIME SONG FEST" 

Sung by the Audience 
Led by Chautauqua Chorus 
Baritone Solo — "Rocked in the Cradle of the Deep" 
Soprano Solo — "Love's Old Sweet Song" 
"Annie Laurie" 
"Hail Columbia" 
"The Battle Cry of Freedom" 
"Massa's in the Cold Ground" 
"The Last Rose of Summer" 
"My Maryland" 
"Old Folks at Home" 
"Home, Sweet Home" 

TUESDAY, AUGUST 26th 
8:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 

9:30 A. M. Children's Drill and Folk Dance, led by Miss Dawson. 
8:00 P. M. Motion Pictures. 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 27th 
8:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 

9:30 A. M. Children's Drill and Folk Dance, led by Miss Flora B. Dawson. 
8:00 P. M. Motion Pictures. 

THURSDAY, AUGUST 28th 
:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 

:30 A. M. Folk Dance and Children's Drill, led by Miss Flora B. Dawson. 
:00 P. M. CANTATA, "MISSION OF THE ROSE," with Marches and Folk 
Dances by the Children, directed by Miss Flora B. Dawson. 

FRIDAY, AUGUST 29th 
8:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 
8:00 P. M. Motion Pictures. 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 30th 
Closing Night 
8:30 A. M. Devotional Hour. 
3:30 P. M. Base Ball Game. 

8:00 P. M. "CHAUTAUQUA JUBILEE," under auspices Ladies' Civic Im- 
provement Association. 

The ladies promise the best entertainment of the season. 
The "Jubilee" last season was a genuine hit. The Auditorium 
was packed and every one present, highly pleased. 

The entertainment set for this, the closing night, will excel 
anything ever attempted before by the ladies. 

The big Jubilee on closing night always draws a large at- 
tendance from St. Louis and towns surrounding. A treat is 
in prospect which none can afford to miss. Keep your eye 
on this night. 

SUNDAY, AUGUST 31st 
9:30 A. M. Sunday School. Classes for all ages. 
11:00 A. M. Morning Service. Sermon by Rev. Samuel G. Huey, Pastor, 
Grand Avenue United Presbyterian Church, St. Louis. 
4:30 P. M. Vesper Service. 

8:00 P. M. Sacred Concert, led by Chautauqua Chorus, closing with, "God 
be with you 'till we meet again." 



26 New Piasa Chautauqua 



PIASA CHAUTAUQUA NOTES 



BOY SCOUTS AT CHAUTAUQUA 

The Directors, appreciating the importance of the Boy Scout movement, 
offer free admission to all Boy Scouts during encampment in order to 
encourage the various troops to hold their encampment at Chautauqua. 
There is plenty of space for encampments, and no more beautiful place can 
be found than at Piasa Chautauqua. We will also assist the Scout Masters 
in preparing their encampment and in every other way possible to make 
their encampment at Chautauqua most enjoyable. Correspondence with the 
manager solicited. 

PRIZES FOR FLOWER GARDENS 

For the purpose of encouraging the planting of flowers and beautifying 
the Grounds, the Board of Directors offer the following prizes for the best 
flower beds. First prize, $12; second prize, $8; third prize, $5. 

GROCERIES AND MEATS 

The Association operates a grocery and meat shop where may be found 
at all times, a good assortment of groceries, fruits in season, fresh and 
dried meats at reasonable prices. 

ICE 

Daily deliveries of Ice will be made from icehouse located on the grounds 
— prices reasonable. 

BOARDING HOUSES 

There are numerous boarding houses in different parts of the grounds, 
where good accommodations can be had at satisfactory rates. See partial list 
of Hotels and Boarding Houses on page 40. 

EXCURSION RATES. 

Excursion rates are offered during the entire Assembly period, by both 
railroads and steamboats. 

Many beautiful and interesting spots can be reached by short trips from 
Chautauqua, which can be made on foot or by boat. Among these are the 
Jerseyville Road, with its wealth of wild flowers. Nugent's Bluff, Elsah, 
Portage des Sioux, Grafton, Babb's Hollow, Fern Valley, Illinois River, Alton, 
Jerseyville, Lover's Leap, and the Indian Mounds. 



Chautauqua, Illinois 



27 



August 21st and 22nd will be known as Woman's Christian Temperance 
Union's Days at Chautauqua. The W. C. T. U. ladies will have charge of the pro- 
gram during these days with a number of fine speakers, a gold medal contest, 
and other features that will be very interesting. See Program August 21st 
and August 22nd. 




W. C. T. U. COTTAGE, CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 



The W. C. T. U. Cottage contains 12 rooms. Special low rates are made 
for week, month or season. Prior to June 1st address Mrs. Jesse Hanan, 
Superintendent, Springfield, 111. After June 1st address Chautauqua, 111. Cor- 
respondence solicited. 



A genuine relief from the worries and heat of the city is the "week end" 
stay from Saturday to Monday morning at Piasa Chautauqua. Why not buy a 
season ticket? Good June 1st to September 6th. Price only $4.00 — admits 
you to everything. 



Ninety minutes after leaving St. Louis, the office or shop-tired man or 
woman finds perfect rest and simple pleasure and amusements, and a bed 
jwhere blankets are always necessary, so cool are the nights at Piasa 
Chautauqua. 



Piasa Chautauqua was not organized for the purpose of making money. 
Its revenue is derived from gate admissions, concessions, assessments against 
property holders, and gifts from friends. Buy a season ticket. Good June 
1st to September 6th. Price only $4.00. Best investment you can make. 



From June 1st to Sept. 6th, every person on the Piasa Chautauqua 
Grounds is required to have a ticket. 

See Rates of Admission on Page 2. 



See item Page 40 reference to Railroad Time Table. 



28 



New Piasa Chautauqua 




'SUMMER REST' 



"Summer Rest," the vacation resort for business women, has for many 
years been successfully conducted by the managers of the Woman's Chris- 
tian Home, St. Louis, Mo. 

It is permanently located on one of the most attractive sites of the 
beautiful grounds of Piasa Chautauqua. 

It cordially invites business women who desire a pleasant, restful vaca- 
tion at small expense. 

Any woman of good moral character, earning her living, and mother and 
sisters dependent upon her, are cordially invited to spend their vacation at 
Summer Rest. Board $3.00 per week; special terms when necessary. 

Summer Rest will open June 1st. Until the industrial women occupy the 
entire hotel, friends of the Christian Home are invited to hold house-parties 
at a low rental. For such a purpose no more charming spot can be chosen. 
Full particulars given at 



ST. LOUIS WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN HOME, 

1814 Washington Avenue, 

St. Louis, Mo. 
(After June 1st, Chautauqua, 111.) 



Chautauqua, Illinois 



29 



KING'S DAUGHTERS' SUMMER HOME. 

Conducted by the Piasa Chautauqua Circle of the King's Daughters & 
Sons. The object is to give an outing to worthy, self-supporting women and 
girls where they can find amusement, rest, a library and have all the 
advantages of the Chautauqua lectures and entertainments. The Home is 
non-sectarian. Rooms and board, $2.00 per week. Reference from some re- 
sponsible person required. Home open July 1st to Sept. 1st. 




• THE KING'S DAUGHTERS' SUMMER HOME. 

All wage-earning women are eligible. For further information write to 
Mrs. Pauline Collins, 1610 Henry Street, Alton, 111., before July 1st, or Mrs. 
A. T. Flint, 2620 Tennessee Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. Bell Phone, Grand 212811. 

After June 1st, Chautauqua, 111. 

The Illinois Branch of the International order of The King's Daughters 
& Sons will hold their State Convention at Chautauqua in September. 



Smile! A smile goes farther than a frown and costs no more. Smile 
and make others smile. Endeavor to make every one about you happy and 
content. Don't fail to do your part in helping to make this old world a 
more cheerful place to live in. Don't frown — Smile! now, that's better! 



Boys and girls can depend on having a fine time at Chautauqua. Come 
and meet your friends, you will find most of them here. 



30 



New Piasa Chautauqua 



A few types of cottages, selected from among the 125 
now at Chautauqua. 




"DAD'S DEN" 
Mrs. E. G. Kupferle, St. Louis. 




"RIVERVIEW" 
D. W. Woods, St. Louis, Mo. 



Chautauqua, Illinois 



31 




"ROCKY BEND" 
L. W. Manning, St. Louis, Mo. 




THE "ENGLISH COTTAGE" 
J. N. English, Jerseyville, III. 



32 



New Piasa Chautauqua 




"ELMHURST" 
Geo. H. Steen, St. Louis. 




"OUATOGA LODGE" 
Mrs. Gus. V. R. Mechin, St. Louis, Mo. 



Chautauqua, Illinois 



33 




"SLEEPY HOLLOW" 
Dr. Yerkes, Upper Alton, III. 



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"AYRSHIRE" 
L. N. Burns, Racine, Wis. 



34 



New Piasa Chautauqua 





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"SYCAMORE LODGE" 
Mrs. Geo. Caughlan, East St. Louis, III. 




"OAKHURST" 
Mrs. J. A. Corrington, East St. Louis, III. 



Chautauqua, Illinois 



35 




"BROWN GABLES" 

Geo, H. Broeder, St. Louis. 




THE "LOG CABIN" 
C. Bernet, St. Louis, Mo. 



36 



New Piasa Chautauqua 




THE "WYCKOFF" 
Mrs. D. A. Wyckoff, Upper Alton, III. 




"ALLE-QUIP-PA LODGE" "WEE-TA- MOO LODGE" 

A. N. Lewis, St. Louis, Mo. W. E. Caulfield, St. Louis, Mo. 



38 New Piasa Chautauqua 

Cottage Owners at Chautauqua 

Name of Owner. Address Name of Cottage. 

Anderson, Mrs. Mary J., Carlinville, 111 Gram's Shelter 

Anderson, Mrs. J. CL, Carlinville, 111 "The Roost" 

Andrews, Mrs. Emma, et al., Brighton, 111 Trabue 

Barnes, Rev. Edmond, Odin, 111 Kentucky Home 

Beckwith, A. M., 611 N. 32d St., East St. Louis Takitazy 

Behymer, F. A., Lebanon, 111 Bee-at-eze 

Bell, Mrs. Hattie S., Medora, 111 .' Belleview 

Bell, Mrs. Hattie, Medora, 111 Watson Cottage 

Bell., Mrs. Hattie S., Medora, 111 Summer Rest 

Bernet, Christian, 5557 Cates Ave., St. Louis Log Cabin 

Bliss, Florence and Marie, 5400 Vernon Ave., St. Louis Wa-wo-naissa 

Bliss, Mrs. H. C, St. Louis Bliss With Inn 

Bringhurst, R. P., 1830 Locust St., St. Louis Bringhurst 

Broeder, Geo. H., 4644 Wagoner PI., St. Louis Brown Gables 

Brown, Mrs. Mary A., North Alton, 111 W. R. C. 

Buckley, Mrs. Mary B., 414 Leverett Ave., Upper Alton Bide-a-Wee 

Burruss, H. D., Carrollton, 111 Greenwood 

Burns, L. N., Racine, Wis Ayrshire 

Catlin, Miss M. E., 513 W. State St., Jerseyville, 111 White Walnut 

Caughlan, D. W., East St. Louis, 111 Bonnie Brae 

Caughlan, D. W., 609 N. 11th St., East St. Louis, 111 House of David 

Caughlan, Geo. S., 625 N. 33rd St., East St. Louis, 111 Sycamore Lodge 

Clark, Mrs. Kathleen, 1123 St. Clair Ave., East St. Louis Inglewood 

Caulfield, W. E., 1399 Union Ave., St. Louis Wee-ta-moo 

Corrington, Mrs. Juliet A Oakhurst 

Durston, Mrs. John, Witt, 111 Woodland 

Eastman, Mrs. John N., Grafton, 111 Eastman 

Ellison, Mrs. S. C, St. Louis Solid Comfort 

English, J. N., Jerseyville, 111 English 

Emerson, T. G., 136 Evergreen Ave., Upper Alton, 111 The Pike 

Fischer, Wm. A., 5231 Kensington Ave., St. Louis Wethinkso Lodge 

Flint, A. T., 2620 Tennessee Ave., St. Louis Hustle-Not 

Flint, Mrs. A. T., 2620 Tennessee Ave., St. Louis '. Tramp Inn 

Fox, John (2), Jerseyville, 111 .-.Fox Den 

French, Mrs. L. J. Brighton, 111 , .French 

Grange, State of Illinois Grange Hall 

Grundman, Dr. F. W., Jefferson Ave. and Wash St., St. Louis Mexico 

Hamilton, P. M., Agent, Jerseyville, 111 Cross Patch 

Haynes, L. C, 526 N. 10th St., East St. Louis, 111 Igloo 

Hickman, J. B., Delhi, 111 Imo 

Hilliard, G. W., Brighton, 111 Hillside 

Hockaday, W. A., 1112 College Ave., East St. Louis, 111 Idle Hours 

Johnson, Isaac, St. Louis Laff alot 

Jones, John, Brighton, 111 Jones 

Kelsey, J. E., 723 Alby St., Alton, 111 Kelsey 

Kennedy, Miss Charlotte B., 2924 Eads Ave., St. Louis The Colonial- 
King's Daughters, The, St. Louis Summer Rest Home 

Kupferle, Mrs. Emma G., 5215 Lindell Ave., St. Louis The Maples 

Kupferle, Mrs. Emma G., 5215 Lindell Ave., St. Louis Dad's Den 

Ladies' Civic Improvement League House of Public Comfort 

Lamb, Mrs. Ann., Jerseyville, 111 Lamb's Quarter 

Lamb, Mrs. E. J. Jerseyville, 111 Lamb's Fold 

Lehman, Geo. E., 6339 Clayton Road, St. Louis Bluffside 

Leverett, Mrs. Jennie (2) Upper Alton, 111 Leverett 

Levis, Nelson, Alton, 111 Seldom Inn 

Lewis, A. N., 716 Chestnut St., St. Louis Alle-quip-pa, Lodge 

Schultz, W. S., Shipman, 111 Summer Home 



Chautauqua, Illinois 39 



Cottage Owners — Continued 

Name of Owner. Address Name of Cottage. 

Manning, Lewis W., 5152 Morgan St., St. Louis Rocky Bend 

Marsh, Heirs, Jerseyville, 111 Hillcrest 

McArthur, Mrs. Sarah, St. Louis Palmer Rest 

McClure, Robert, Jerseyville, 111 McClure 

Mechin, Gus V. R., 5088 Raymond Ave., St. Louis Ouatoga Lodge 

Meriwether, E. G., Alton, 111 _ g "Court" Lodge 

Meinhardt, Miss Mathilda, 7041 Florissant Ave., St. Louis Flora 

Meints, A. E., 1242 St. Louis Ave., East St. Louis Castle Inn 

Miller, David, 1020 Summit Ave., East St. Louis The Frolic 

Mott, Mrs. Louisa M., 2621 S. Compton Ave., St. Louis Home, Sweet Home 

Noble, Mrs. Emma, 450 Leverett Ave., Upper Alton, 111 Kumonin 

Kremer, Miss Bertha. Edwardsville, 111 Kremer 

Palmer, F. W., 2808 Eads Ave., St. Louis Fernhurst 

Pavey, Mrs. C. W., Mt. Vernon, 111 The Shack 

Perrin, Mrs. M. A., 615 E. 12th St., Alton, 111 Shady Dell 

Pfeffer, Mrs. Wm. T., M'organford Road, St. Louis Brookside 

Pingree, S. S., St. Louis Pingree 

Priest, Mrs. Lucia I., 419 Henry St., Alton, 111 '. Club House 

Priest, Mrs. Lucia I., 419 Henry St., Alton, 111 Maple Hurst 

Rain, Mrs. Isabelle G., 2601 State St., Alton, 111 White Ribbon Rest 

Raithel, Geo. E., 4343 Forest Park Blvd., St. Louis Dew Drop Inn 

Roades, Nettie B., Chautauqua, 111 Restawhyle 

Roades, Nettie B. ( Chautauqua, 111 ^ Bohannon 

Roberts, Mrs. Augusta, St. Louis Buckeye Home 

Rodgers, A. F., Box 59, College and Rogers Ave., Upper Alton, 111 The Lodge 

Rudolph, J. S., 4040 Page Ave., St. Louis Two Oakes 

Scarritt, Rev. J. A., 319 E. Fourth St., Alton, 111 Pioneer Home 

Simmons, R. L., Brighton, 111 Nixon 

Sisson, Cyrus A. and Jennie M., Jerseyville, 111 Mushroom 

Slayton, Mrs. John N. Grafton, 111 Slayton Inn 

Smith, Mrs. Hannah B., Shipman, 111 Linger Longer 

Smith, H. V., Bunker Hill, 111 Sun Set 

Smith, Jane C, Heirs, Waverly, 111 Smith 

Spencer, Miss Anna, Jerseyville, 111 "Caro" 

Stewart, Byron, St. Louis The Shanty 

Steen, Geo. H., 5138 Kensington Ave., St. Louis Elmhurst 

Mrs. Rhoades, Chautauqua, 111 Sans Souci 

Spreecher, Mrs. D. W., 538 N. 14th St., East St. Louis Edgewood 

Talley, H. G., est., Piasa, 111 G. A. R. Inn 

Tunehorst, H. A., Jerseyville, 111 Tunehorst Rest 

Van Treese, Rev. F. M., Carmi, 111 Van Lodge 

Williams, C. T., 4256 Flad Ave., St. Louis Williamsyde 

Woods, D. W., 3536 Victor St., St. Louis Rivervlew 

Woods, J. P., 5215 Lindell Ave., St. Louis Outing Inn 

Woods, J. P., 5215 Lindell Ave., St. Louis House That Jack Built 

Woods, Mrs. J. P., 5215 Lindell Ave., St. Louis Grandview 

White, Mrs. J. C, Manning St., Upper Alton, 111 Whitehall 

Woman's Christian Home, St. Louis Summer Rest 

Woman's Christian Temperance Union "W. C. T. U. 

Woman's Relief Corps W jj q 

Wyckoff, Mrs. D. A., 150 Manning St., Upper Alton, 111 Wyckoff 

Yerkes, Dr. T. T., Upper Alton (Mrs. Pauline Collins in charge) . .Sleepy Hollow 
Terkes, Dr. T. T., Upper Alton (Mrs. Pauline Collins in charge) Twin Cottage 



40 



New Piasa Chautauqua 



HOTEL AND BOARDING HOUSE RATES AT NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA 

Hotels and Boarding Houses are making reasonable rates for season of 1913. The 
service rendered is commensurate with the price charged, being equal to and in 
most cases superior to that supplied at most resorts where the rates are higher and 
the service oftentimes more or less indifferent. We list below a few only, with whom 
the expectant visitor may correspond in advance with reference to making reservation. 
Several whose names do not appear among this list, because of failure to respond 
in time to the committee's inquiry, are fixed to accommodate guests by the day, 
week, or month — with or without Board. A complete register is kept on file in the 
manager's office on the grounds, where strangers may apply for additional information. 

"THE INN" PIASA SPRINGS HOTEL 

an wnnme 40 Rooms 

»u Kooms Under Management of L C. I. A. 

Mrs. H. C. Dudley, Manager Rooms Only 

American Plan-Without Bath *g J^k y 2nd ^-y ;;;;;;;; ;;; ;;; ;* J;JJ 

1 in room $12.50 weekly; $2.50 daily Per month (2nd floor) IS. 00 

2 in room, each. 10.00 weekly; 2.00 daily Per week (3rd floor) 4.00 

3 or more, each. 9.00 weekly; 1.50 daily Per month (3rd floor) 14.00 

With Bath Lodging— $0.50 
, . .,_ nA , . *o aa j ?i Two in room (2nd floor $8.00 weekly 

1 n room ".W.M weekly; $3.00 daily Three in r3 a floor ).... 6.00 weekly 

2 in room, each. 12.50 weedy; 2.50 daily Two , room (2nd floor) . .■ $30 . 00 monthly 

3 or more, each. 10.00 weekly; 2.00 dail> Three in room f3rd floor) . . 2 0.00 monthly 
Rooms, without meals, $1.00 daily, each 

Meals. 50c each "BELL VIEW" 

Special orders for meals, for parties. Conducted by Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Bell 

$i.uu per piate Per week> roorn and board $7.00 

Special rates to House Parties Per day, room and board 1.00 

Room only, two in room, weekly.... 5.00 

THE KING'S DAUGHTERS' SUMMER Have als0 Cottage for Rent by Week or 

for Season 
HOME Correspondence Solicited 

A ten-room cottage, where wage-earn- 

ing women can get board at a nominal «\y R. C. COTTAGE" 

sum. Nonsectarian. Open July 1st to 

September 15th. Conducted by Mrs. M. A. Brown 

All wage-earniner young women eligible. Per week, room and board $7.00 

For further information write to Mrs. Per day, room and board.... 1.00 

Pauline Collins, 1104 Henry Street. Alton, Correspondence Solicited 

111., before July 1st, or Mrs. A. T. Flint, 

2620 Tennessee Avenue, St. Louis. Mo. 

"KENTUCKY HOME" 

THE W. C. T. U. COTTAGE Conducted by Mrs. Edmond Barnes 

12 Rooms Rates are not at hand at time of going 

Rates Per Week. $4.00, $5.00 and $6 00, to press, same, however, are in line 

according to location of rooms with those charged by others. 

Special Rates for the Season Address Mrs. Edmond Barnes, 

Lodging 25 Cents "Kentucky Home," Chautauqua. 

Good Bath Room and Other Conveniences 

"THE PIASA BIRD" 

"SUMMER REST" Conducted by Geo. W. McCreary 

Conducted by Who will serve during season 

Womans' Christian Home Association A Delicatessen Breakfast 

of St. Louis An A La Carte Lunch 

For Working Women Only r>;-,- Q , r,.~ m k a "f . * c , , , 
= Dinner from 5 o clock to S o clock 

Board— $3.00 Per Week Only Crystal Water Co.'s products used 



RAILROAD TIME TABLE 

At the time this book goes to press, neither the "C. P. & St. L. R. R.," the 
"E. St. Louis & Suburban Ry. Co. (Alton Branch)" or the "Boat Lines" have their 
summer season time table printed. As our Year Book is in circulation prior to June 
1st, on which date the summer season schedule Is put into effect, we are obliged to 
omit all time tables. Chautauqua visitors will obtain full information at their ticket 
office. Time table, giving special rates, will be in effect June 1st. Ask your ticket 
agent. 

PRESS OF PERRIN i. SMITH,